How to Ikigai

Lessons for Finding Happiness and Living Your Life's Purpose

How to Ikigai

Live Your Best Life Ancient, time-tested wisdom: Okinawa, Japan is a tiny, tiny island south of the Japanese mainland where people live their life’s purpose every day. How is it possible for so many to live each day in such meaningful ways? The Okinawan concept of Ikigai. How to Ikigai describes the lifestyle choices that have led to an island full of fulfilled, long-living people. Magical reality come to life: Examples of ikigai in action are often magical. Take David Michiels. David stuttered severely well into his adulthood. In clinical terms, his stutter was difficult to treat. But David started to work in a liquor store. Before long, his focus turned to one specific section of the sales floor: the scotch section. As he spent more of his days learning about scotch, he began to share his knowledge with customers. Eventually, David noticed that his stutter vanished when he talked to anyone about scotch. Over time, David’s passion led to a new life. Today, he is a renowned whiskey expert, traveling the world tasting and purchasing whiskey on behalf of his employer. He feels his life is meaningful because of ikigai. A humble look at happiness: Bringing together an exploration of joy not unlike that of The Book of Joy by the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a look inward reminiscent of The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer, and deep truths like those explored by Singer in The Surrender Experiment, How to Ikigai describes the concept of Ikigai with clarity and meaning. How to Ikigai explains a simple but abstract map for living a meaningful life. After reading this book, you will understand how to implement Ikigai’s four directions in your own life: • Do what you love • Do what you’re good at • Do what the world needs • Do what you can be rewarded for

Practical Guide to Ikigai

How to Find Purpose, Happiness, and Longevity Through Mini Habits, the Japanese Way

Practical Guide to Ikigai

LEARN THE SECRETS OF CALM AND ANXIETY-FREE LIFE... Have you ever suffered from mild or severe stress and anxiety? Would you like to perfectly balance your mind and your body to achieve fulfillment and happiness? Or maybe, you already heard about IKIGAI, and now you want to master Japanese ways of living? If you answered "Yes" to at least one of these questions, then keep reading... "PRACTICAL GUIDE TO IKIGAI" - an everyday guide that is going to teach you the Japanese way of living and change your perception about life and its purpose. Over 70% of people in the USA at least once a week suffer from daily stress and anxiety. It is no different in almost all western countries. Medications and various drugs became the most popular treatment methods to manage and control such diseases as severe anxiety and depression. Is there a better way? Years ago I was in the same spot you may be right now, looking for my purpose in life, it looked like the only weight I was carrying on my shoulders was the weight of stress and severe anxiety. It wasn't getting better until one day, a day when I decided to listen to my Japanese Grandmother, to look back at my roots, and learn about the IKIGAI method. After many years of practicing and teaching others the Japanese way of living, I decided to create a book and help as many people as I can to find their life path and forget stress and anxiety once and for all. Take a look at only a few things you are going to get out of this book: IKIGAI diagram to figure out your life purpose The most important pillars of IKIGAI The power of small things you need to do every day What is Okinawa diet why it can be called the healthiest? 8 tiny changes to make your life 10-times more enjoyable How to get rid of stress and anxiety once and for all? Happiness and longevity the Japanese way 5 exercises for a happier and more productive life Much much more... If you came to this point, you are definitely ready to start your IKIGAI journey, so don't wait. Scroll up, click on "Buy Now" and start learning!

Ikigai

The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life

Ikigai

*Los Angeles Times bestseller* “If hygge is the art of doing nothing, ikigai is the art of doing something—and doing it with supreme focus and joy.” —New York Post Bring meaning and joy to all your days with this internationally bestselling guide to the Japanese concept of ikigai (pronounced ee-key-guy)—the happiness of always being busy—as revealed by the daily habits of the world’s longest-living people. What’s your ikigai? “Only staying active will make you want to live a hundred years.” —Japanese proverb According to the Japanese, everyone has an ikigai—a reason for living. And according to the residents of the Japanese village with the world’s longest-living people, finding it is the key to a happier and longer life. Having a strong sense of ikigai—the place where passion, mission, vocation, and profession intersect—means that each day is infused with meaning. It’s the reason we get up in the morning. It’s also the reason many Japanese never really retire (in fact there’s no word in Japanese that means retire in the sense it does in English): They remain active and work at what they enjoy, because they’ve found a real purpose in life—the happiness of always being busy. In researching this book, the authors interviewed the residents of the Japanese village with the highest percentage of 100-year-olds—one of the world’s Blue Zones. Ikigai reveals the secrets to their longevity and happiness: how they eat, how they move, how they work, how they foster collaboration and community, and—their best-kept secret—how they find the ikigai that brings satisfaction to their lives. And it provides practical tools to help you discover your own ikigai. Because who doesn’t want to find happiness in every day?

Pursuits of Happiness

Well-being in Anthropological Perspective

Pursuits of Happiness

Anthropology has long shied away from examining how human beings may lead happy and fulfilling lives. This book, however, shows that the ethnographic examination of well-being--defined as "the optimal state for an individual, a community, and a society"--and the comparison of well-being within and across societies is a new and important area for anthropological inquiry. Distinctly different in different places, but also reflecting our common humanity, well-being is intimately linked to the idea of happiness and its pursuits. Noted anthropological researchers have come together in this volume to examine well-being in a range of diverse ways and to investigate it in a range of settings: from the Peruvian Amazon, the Australian outback, and the Canadian north, to India, China, Indonesia, Japan, and the United States. Gordon Mathews is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He has written What Makes Life Worth Living? How Japanese and Americans Make Sense of Their Worlds (1996) and Global Culture /Individual Identity: Searching for Home in the Cultural Supermarket (2000), and co-written Hong Kong, China: Learning to Belong to a Nation (2007); he has co-edited Consuming Hong Kong (2001) and Japan's Changing Generations (2004). Carolina Izquierdo is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for the Everyday Lives of Families (CELF) at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research has centered on health and well-being among the Matsigenka in the Peruvian Amazon, the Mapuche in Chile, and middle-class families in the United States.

The Little Book of Ikigai

The secret Japanese way to live a happy and long life

The Little Book of Ikigai

AS HEARD ON THE STEVE WRIGHT SHOW 'FORGET HYGGE. IT'S ALL ABOUT IKIGAI (THAT'S JAPANESE FOR A HAPPY LIFE)' The Times Find out how to live a long and happy life thanks to the ikigai miracle, a Japanese philosophy that helps you find fulfilment, joy and mindfulness in everything you do. It is extraordinary that Japanese men's longevity ranks 4th in the world, while Japanese women's ranks 2nd. But perhaps this comes as no surprise when you know that the Japanese understanding of ikigai is embedded in their daily life and in absolutely everything that they do. In their professional careers, in their relationships with family members, in the hobbies they cultivate so meticulously. Ken Mogi identifies five key pillars to ikigai: Pillar 1: Starting small Pillar 2: Releasing yourself Pillar 3:Harmony and sustainability Pillar 4:The joy of little things Pillar 5:Being in the here and now The Japanese talk about ikigai as 'a reason to get up in the morning'. It is something that keeps one's enthusiasm for life going, whether you are a cleaner of the famous Shinkansen bullet train, the mother of a newborn child or a Michelin-starred sushi chef. The Five Pillars at the heart of everything they do. But how do you find your own ikigai? How does ikigai contribute to happiness? Neuroscientist and bestselling Japanese writer Ken Mogi provides an absorbing insight into this way of life, incorporating scientific research and first-hand experience, and providing a colourful narrative of Japanese culture and history along the way.

What Makes Life Worth Living?

How Japanese and Americans Make Sense of Their Worlds

What Makes Life Worth Living?

Here is an original and provocative anthropological approach to the fundamental philosophical question of what makes life worth living. Gordon Mathews considers this perennial issue by examining nine pairs of similarly situated individuals in the United States and Japan. In the course of exploring how people from these two cultures find meaning in their daily lives, he illuminates a vast and intriguing range of ideas about work and love, religion, creativity, and self-realization. Mathews explores these topics by means of the Japanese term ikigai, "that which most makes one's life seem worth living." American English has no equivalent, but ikigai applies not only to Japanese lives but to American lives as well. Ikigai is what, day after day and year after year, each of us most essentially lives for. Through the life stories of those he interviews, Mathews analyzes the ways Japanese and American lives have been affected by social roles and cultural vocabularies. As we approach the end of the century, the author's investigation into how the inhabitants of the world's two largest economic superpowers make sense of their lives brings a vital new understanding to our skeptical age.

Contemporary Sociology

A Journal of Reviews, July 1976 - Volume 5, Number 4

Contemporary Sociology


Men and Masculinities: Global masculinities

Men and Masculinities: Global masculinities

The sociology of masculinity began to assume real significance from the late 1980s onwards. Part of "Critical Concepts in Sociology" series, this five volume set brings together material in the field, and serves as a useful resource for scholars and students.